Resilience Blog Posts

During this year's Native American Heritage Month, Tribal leaders and high-level White House Officials constructed discourse with respect to issues important in Indian Country.  The 2021 Tribal Nations Summit (the Summit), hosted by the White House, was held on November 15th and 16th. This is the first time the Summit has taken place since 2016. The Summit presented a unique opportunity for nation-to-nation dialogue on support to Tribal communities to create opportunities, advance equity, and address new and long-standing challenges. Topics addressed included Infrastructure, Native languages, climate change and COVID-19. Several members of the American Indian Policy Institute (AIPI) attended the Summit.

The Summit commenced by releasing the “White House Tribal...

The American Indian Policy Institute will soon announce the inaugural cohort of the Indigenous Leadership Academy! Please join our mailing list to stay up to date here

I was jolted awake at 2 am yesterday by my phone ringing. On the other end was my sister. She was traveling to Spain by airplane, fainted on the plane, broke her nose, and was calling me from the hospital. She was sad, and mostly disappointed that her plans had shifted. Luckily, there wasn’t anything healthwise wrong with her and by that afternoon, she was sightseeing and posting on her social media. How was she able to jump back on track...

The Indigenous Leadership Academy (ILA)  is excited to announce the hiring of Dr. Denise Bates, PhD as the ILA Curriculum Writer! You can read more about Dr. Bates here

Have you ever been given a responsibility that you felt was out of your depth? Did you apply to a program and thought, “now what?” as you waited to hear back from the program? Did you ever wish you had an extra set of eyes and someone to bounce next step ideas off of and gain their insights? If you answered “yes” to any of the above mentioned questions, mentorship is the answer. Mentorship is a wonderful tool to...

Usually, summer is a slow time at the ASU campus. However, these last two summers have been quite the exception一not despite the pandemic, but because of it!  

Last summer we were locked down, working from our homes, and yet still determined to carry out our mission of serving Indian Country. During this time we worked on getting the word out on the 2.5 GHz Tribal Priority in Spectrum Licencing window in addition to authoring several policy briefs and sharing information. The pandemic shined a light on many things, but especially the ugly truth of just how disconnected Tribal lands are. During the pandemic, Tribes were like the canary in the coal mine. As...

This past weekend (June 5th - 7th) I went to the White Earth Nation in Northern Minnesota to witness the Treaty People Gathering on Treaty rights and Tribal sovereignty. This event brought together more than 1,000 people from across the country to learn about Tribal sovereignty, Treaty rights, and Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women (MMIW) surrounding the Line 3 Pipeline. 

Line 3 is a pipeline that runs through North Dakota and Minnesota through to Wisconsin. It is called a replacement pipeline project because it takes an older pipeline out of commission and replaces it with a new pipeline. This replacement project, however, runs along a new route, which crosses over 200...

Earlier this year, the AIPI was a partner with the Virginia G. Piper Center For Creative Writing under their prestigious award from the National Institute of the Arts Grant The Big Read.  The goal of this program is to expose communities to diverse books and perspectives they may never have otherwise discovered. So, as a newcomer to Phoenix, when I saw that the Phoenix Indian School was one of the locations and a  part of The NEA Big Read: Phoenix I immediately jumped at the opportunity to view the webinar, and later, tour the school. After listening to the stories from two former students, and...

February was a busy and chaotic month, but in the best way possible. Whether our team attended legislative sessions and conferences, or participated in town hall meetings and committees, it became obvious that a particular theme permeated the atmosphere: hope, or in the Chickasaw language, anhi

Anhi (Hope). That is how I feel when I see the phenomenal vaccination programs organized in Tribal communities; simultaneously working to eradicate COVID-19, and also the perception that we are not capable of managing our own affairs. It’s a feeling of comfort in knowing that we are taking care of our elders, the cultural caretakers and language guardians of our traditions. It is the same hope our...

Afammi Himitta' Ayokpa (Happy New Year). We all hope this will be a better year than 2020. Yet, we cannot overlook the good work that took place in 2020, despite the dire circumstances. At AIPI, it was a very productive year and our staff rose to the occasion and produced high-quality work that served tribes. Watch for our forthcoming Annual Report to learn more about our work in 2020. 

As we welcome two new staff members and hire two additional staff members, our work pace will continue at its fast pace. Late in 2020; the new stimulus act passed into law contained substantive provisions for Native Nations. We'll be publishing more...

The 2020 elections featured the highest number of ballots cast in American history and was a landmark election for Indigenous representation at the Federal and State levels. In 2018, the first Native American women were elected to Congress as Representatives Deb Haaland (D-NM-1), and Sharice Davids (D-KS-3) were elected alongside incumbent Representatives Markwayne Mullin (R-OK-2) and Tom Cole (R-OK-4). In 2020, the number of Indigenous representatives increased again as six candidates successfully won their federal elections, including Congressman-elect Kai Kahele (D-HI-2) and Congresswoman-elect Yvette Herrell (R-NM-2). 

New Mexico’s three-member House delegation now includes two Indigenous women. One of whom, Rep. Haaland, is currently being vetted for Secretary...

Nannakya ilánchi. Everything is changing. Everything has changed.  The election is over, and as we struggle with how we as a nation go forward, not back, our communities need compassion, and they need leadership. And as we continue as a nation to struggle with COVID as new infections surge, this winter promises to be as bad as or worse than the summer.  This virus has changed everything about our lives. Whether we like it or not, we are not going back to the world as we knew it.  But let me tell you why I am looking forward.
 
Many changes are happening in government and in Tribal governance. All necessitated by...

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